A Domino’s lesson: The components

Domino’s has flat-out revolutionized the pizza ordering experience.

Coming back to their promise of quick delivery pizza, their online site is literally a real-time tracker of the creation and delivery of your pie.

Check it out, you place your order and then you’re presented with this screen (click images to enlarge):

Above, we see that Steve’s put my order in the oven at 10 PM sharp. We’re in baking mode.

Seven minutes later, “delivery expert” Ozzy is on his way:

Fast forward a few minutes, I’m eating a slice of deep dish Italian sausage, rating my experience:

I voted high praise. Five stars across the board.

So how about that?

The whole thing got me thinking of how many components go into almost any product–and how many opportunities there are to differentiate yourself by choosing one component to be really, really great at.

Pizza is a perfect example. When asked how to make your pizza brand great, it’s easy to focus on the pizza. It’s easy to say, let’s make a great tasting pizza. Or let’s make a square pizza. Or let’s make some wild flavors.

The majority of this great experience with Domino’s, however, had nothing to do with the pizza itself.

Rather, they revolutionized an otherwise overlooked component of the pizza delivery world. The process is remarkable and in perfect alignment with their quick delivery story.

So, if you’re having trouble differentiating, try focusing on a brand component. Then make it remarkable. Sometimes that’s the trick.

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Branding

3 responses to “A Domino’s lesson: The components

  1. Jason

    “The majority of this great experience with Domino’s, however, had nothing to do with the pizza itself.”

    Well, that makes sense, since their pizza is terrible. Honestly, if you offered 100 people the choice between a free pie from the pizza place of their choice (even restricting the test to nationwide chains), how many would choose Dominoes?

  2. First off, I agree. But, not sure where you’re headed with this for two reasons:

    1.) Let’s try your test on cars. If cars were free, who’d be driving a Toyota Carolla?

    2.) Back to pizza, what national chain would win? And given the “taste” category is probably beaten to death, I think this further proves my point that you can find a lot of ways to create a remarkable product experience. When it comes to pizza, taste is only one way to do it.

    Now, clearly this wouldn’t work if their pizza was especially lousy. Personally, I found it pretty average–which is how I find the taste of most major brand pizza.

    Either way, thanks for the thoughts. I figured you might be stopping by from time to time, glad to see the post on pizza brought you out. 😉

    Cheers buddy.

  3. Pingback: Being selectively different « The Rally Flag

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s